Apr 1, 2010 - What do we know about the diet of the Rio Grande turkey

If you have questions about what nutrients are important to your bird’s species diet, you should consult with your avian veterinarian. There are, however, some generalities that apply to all parrots. There’s a long list of foods that are really good to feed to your bird. Good protein sources include cooked dried beans (such as black beans, navy beans, red beans, pinto beans, garbanzo beans, kidney beans, lentils and dried split peas), and lean meats like chicken, turkey, and fish (such as salmon, trout, halibut and tuna).

Nov 22, 2013 - Turkeys are some of the most recognizable birds in this country

Intensively housed birds are brooded and reared in the same shed at a density of 5 birds per square metre and processed by 12 weeks of age. A turkey starter diet of between 24% and 28% protein should be fed until 8 weeks of age. Ideally, feed a 28% ration for the first 4 weeks and reduce to 24% for the next 4 weeks. This protein level is reduced to 20% and fed until marketing.

Why do we eat turkey for Thanksgiving and Christmas?

Mar 18, 2016 - Five subspecies of North American Wild Turkey range across the United .. Fossil Farms 100% all-natural, free roaming Nicholas breed turkeys are exceptionally tender and moist. Grown in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, they are fed a vegetarian diet of farm-local corn, rye, oats, alfalfa and soybean meal. Our birds are raised to the specifications of the “Never Ever Program”, where antibiotics, hormones and steroids are never used. Our humanely raised Turkeys are closer in taste to Wild Turkeys, real flavor! Let our Turkey be the centerpiece for your next gathering!

The bird also shows up on the table at Christmas

Fossil Farms 100% all-natural, free roaming Nicholas breed turkeys are exceptionally tender and moist. Grown in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, they are fed a vegetarian diet of farm-local corn, rye, oats, alfalfa and soybean meal. Our birds are raised to the specifications of the “Never Ever Program”, where antibiotics, hormones and steroids are never used. Our humanely raised Turkeys are closer in taste to Wild Turkeys, real flavor! Let our Turkey be the centerpiece for your next gathering!

Wild Turkey | National Geographic


Among the big birds, turkey was ideal for a fall feast. Turkeys born in the spring would spend about seven months eating insects and worms on the farm, growing to about 10 pounds by Thanksgiving. They were cheaper than geese, which were more difficult to raise, and cheaper by the pound than chickens. Cost was an important factor for holiday shoppers, because people weren't necessarily preparing just one meal; Thanksgiving was the time to bake meat and other types of pies that could last through the winter. Harriet Beecher Stowe, in Old-Town Folks, described making fruit pies at Thanksgiving "." (The British once served geese, swans, and even peacocks on special occasions, but they came to prefer turkey after it was first introduced to England in about 1540. Swans, because of their diet, would taste fishy unless they were fed wheat for weeks before slaughter.)Between 85 and 95 percent of an adult turkey's annual diet is comprised of plants. The remainder is animal matter consisting mainly of insects and snails. Turkeys also occasionally consume small snakes, lizards and salamanders. Hard mast such as acorns and pecans; soft mast such as fruits and berries; and seeds and leaves of grasses, forbs and sedges constitute the bulk of an adult turkey's diet. Similar to the young of other gallinaceous birds, wild turkey poults consume insects almost exclusively during the first few weeks of life to obtain protein needed for their rapid growth.