Great for geckos that won't or don't eat any insects

I think that selling a small sampler of the pangea diets would be a pretty awesome idea. New crestie parents could figure out which food their gecko likes best and parents wanting to switch from Repashy that have heard so many amazing things about pangea (like myself) could make sure their gecko likes it before buying a big bag (which 2 oz is when you only have one or two geckos). It could be half an ounce of each flavor and sold at similar prices, because let's face it, buying 2 ounces of each flavor is not a smart plan if your gecko decides that s/he hates a certain flavor.

What do crested geckos eat? Which brands are the best? Get answers to all your crested gecko food-related questions in ReptiFiles' care packet!

Although there are many new formulas, the only crested gecko foods we recommend as staple diets are and . Both have been thoroughly researched and tested on hundreds (even thousands) of animals with great results, leading us to endorse them as the best on the market.

Crested Gecko Diet As Gutload For Crickets? - Pangea Reptile

Crested geckos need a wide variety of foods, MRP is the very best staple diet Each reptile species has varying needs, whether carnivore, omnivore, insectivore, frugivore or herbivore. Little is known about the specific nutritional requirements for crested geckos, but they are classified as omnivores. Anecdotal reports conflict on how much of their diet is comprised of fruit, pollen, nectar or insects, but these are all possible foods to a wild crested gecko. Because of this, it’s best to opt for variety to ensure your gecko gets the proper nutrition and stimulation from their captive diet.

Repashy or Pangea? - Pangea Reptile

Each reptile species has varying needs, whether carnivore, omnivore, insectivore, frugivore or herbivore. Little is known about the specific nutritional requirements for crested geckos, but they are classified as omnivores. Anecdotal reports conflict on how much of their diet is comprised of fruit, pollen, nectar or insects, but these are all possible foods to a wild crested gecko. Because of this, it’s best to opt for variety to ensure your gecko gets the proper nutrition and stimulation from their captive diet.

So it sounds like a mix of the two is best, yeah?


When you receive your new crested gecko, it may take some time for it to adjust to its new surroundings. Geckos can get stressed from being shipped, then placed in a strange environment. This may cause them to go off-feed for several days or more. As long as you set the environment up properly, the gecko should settle in within a few days. One stress factor is the cage type. Most breeders keep their geckos in plastic boxes in a rack system. There is no overhead light other than the ambient room light. Their hot spot comes from heat tape underneath their box. Geckos raised under these conditions usually do very well. However, most pet owners prefer to keep their geckos in a glass tank. They can be decorated much nicer and are better for viewing the animals. The problem is that geckos don't like change. They may be stressed by the glass. The stress level may go up even more if a bright daytime bulb is being used as the primary heat source. Crested Geckos don't like bright light. It will cause them to hide whenever it is on. The best way to acclimate geckos to a glass tank is to do the following: 1: If you use a bulb, make sure it is a nocturnal blue bulb designed for low light emissions. A heat pad can also be used to provide "belly heat". 2: Make sure the gecko has a warm, dark, and somewhat humid hiding place. They need to hide to feel secure. 3: Handle them very infrequently, if at all, for at least the first 2 weeks. 4: Tape black construction paper or cardboard to all 4 sides of the outside of the tank. Every week, remove on side of cardboard. After a month, all 4 sides will be removed. This will give the gecko time to adjust to the new cage. 5: Try to feed it the same food type is used to. Dietary changes can be stressful on crested geckos. 6: If you have geckos and you want to add a new one, keep the new gecko separate for at least 30 days to let it acclimate, and to watch for signs of health concerns. 7: If you put several geckos in one cage, make sure they are approximately the same size. Keep an eye on their food intake to make sure they are all feeding and maintaining good bodyweight. Never, ever put more than one male in a cage, no matter how big the cage is. This way of feeding is most common, and while it’s not “wrong” like an insect only diet, I do not believe it is the best option. Prepared foods have long been sold and promoted as a complete diet, leaving no need for feeder insects. While crested geckos certainly can live on nothing but a prepared diet. I believe they won’t thrive.